Blog Archives - The fusion of old world goldsmithing with modern design
 

Here is an inspiring report about David Martin from upper state New York who has decided to spend his two years of retirement cataloging stained glass windows.

“Every window has a story to tell and it varies from church to church, synagogue to synagogue, wherever you happen to be - - and all of the little images that you see in the windows, they all mean something,” said Martin.

He plans to share his photographs online and publish a book. Meantime, take a look at this article and short video report ...

 

Minerals that were familiar only to gem collectors a few years back are now taking their place as centerpieces in jewelry designs, expanding the possiblities for demonstrating the wearer's personal attitude and style. Starting with translucent Montana agate I began designing these earrings and find there's something very satisfying in creating them, so I've started a collection, highlighting my favorites in the above photo. The stones are handpicked from rough, discarding the majority to find gem quality and then the handcutting and polishing work begins. They are matched with halves that are a right and left, which can be difficult to accomplish, but worth doing so that each pair of earrings is truly made for each other. If I had to pick, the The Austrialian boulder opal earrings are my favorite. When the stones are ready, I use traditional goldsmithing methods, yellow gold and white gold from 14k to 24k, 24k yellow gold granulation here and there, and combining different natural stones, including diamonds, sapphires, fire opals, garnets, and moonstone. These earrings come alive and look stunning when worn, so I think I'll continue making more! -Al

 

In their well-known attempts to make gold, alchemists also provided the foundation for modern chemistry and material sciences. Known as holding the most comprehensive collection of glass in the world, The Corning Museum of Glass explores Northern European glass of the Baroque period and presents the technical advances in glassmaking made by alchemists during that time. Included in this examination is the creation of colorless lead crystal and gold ruby - - two key developments in the history of glass production and artistry. The Corning Museum of Glass opens Glass of the Alchemists: Lead Crystal-Gold Ruby, 1650–1750 on June 27, 2008.

 

Stained glass artist Erin Moffat created this rich crimson colored Celtic knot suncatcher using the Tiffany copper foil method. More of her work including her original acrylic paintings in luxuriant colors and textures can be found in her shop, Colour and Light, and you can learn more about this artist by visiting her blog. Erin writes, "I adore the beauty of glass, and I am so happy to be able to create with it!" - - and, Erin, we look forward to seeing more!


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